Gender Patterns in BPD


http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3115767/

While there may not be gender differences in BPD with regard to prevalence, some specific self-harm behaviors (e.g., self-cutting), and presenting levels of overall psychological distress, there appear to be notable gender differences with regard to personality traits, Axis I and II comorbidity, and treatment utilization histories. With regard to these differences, men with BPD are more likely to demonstrate explosive temperaments coupled with high levels of novelty seeking. Men with BPD are also more likely to evidence substance abuse whereas women with BPD are more likely to evidence eating, mood, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorders. With regard to Axis II comorbidity, men with BPD are more likely than women to have antisocial personality characteristics. Finally, men with BPD are more likely to have treatment histories for substance abuse whereas women with BPD are likely to have utilized more pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy services. Thus, given the similarities in men and women with BPD, there are also clear gender differences in BPD as well. These differences, reported in a number of different studies, may explain why women with BPD are more likely to be over-represented in mental health services and men with BPD are more likely to be over-represented in substance-abuse treatment programs and/or jails. An awareness of these clinical differences is particularly important in evaluating patients in psychiatric or primary care settings, as men and women with BPD appear to have slightly different clinical presentations and treatment histories.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Recent Posts: MAKE BPD STIGMA-FREE!

Free conference on Borderline Personality Disorder – West Island Blog

Source: Free conference on Borderline Personality Disorder – West Island Blog

How to Raise a Unicorn: a Guide for Parents of Creative, Sensitive Children. | elephant journal

Source: How to Raise a Unicorn: a Guide for Parents of Creative, Sensitive Children. | elephant journal

Best selling US author’s campaign to tackle mental health issues comes to Northern Ireland – Belfast Live

Source: Best selling US author’s campaign to tackle mental health issues comes to Northern Ireland – Belfast Live

Recent Posts: DBT Peer Connections

Respecting Emotion & Regulating Emotion: An Introduction to Checking the Facts

Emotions are like a sixth sense because like sight, sound, taste, touch, and smell, they give us important information about our environment that we need to survive. What makes emotions so special is that they help us to act quickly when logical thought is too slow for us to engage in problem-solving. (See Situations below.) However, for people who may be unusually emotionally reactive, sensitive, or have learned to judge or invalidate their emotional sixth sense from culture, values, gender roles, parents, family, loved ones, etc., emotions may not always cause the expected effective response. Therefore, dialectical behavior therapy came up with the skill checking the facts to help us figure out if our emotional responses fit the facts and intensity of a situation and whether an unwanted or distressing emotion needs skills toward accepting and changing or skills toward accepting and tolerating.

Consultation Team Agreements for DBT Peer Support Specialists

Adapted from the Linehan Board of Certification by Rachel Cara Gill For DBT Peer Connections Facebook Group Administrators Consultation Team All DBT Connections Facebook Group Administrators are required to complete the FREE DBT Skills Training E-course prior to joining the consultation team Request to join DBT Peer Connections Facebook Skills Support Group as a general […]

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 869 other followers

Follow Borderline & PMDD on WordPress.com

Goodreads

Blog Stats

  • 12,918 hits

Community

%d bloggers like this: