31 DAYS of BPD: DAY 7: HAVE YOU EVER DISSOCIATED?


Yes, I guess I have earned how to dissociate early on…. to others it may seem funny… the fact that even if you show me a picture of me in a certain place, I will say no I wasn’t there, I don’t remember being there.. It’s not amnesia, for if I’m shown the picture more and am told about the events that took place there I remember eventually… but with remembering comes back the guilt and shame and whatever else made me dissociate… I figure that each time I was screamed at, made stupid, abused emotionally, I simply turn off.. it’s not a conscious process, I just got enough practice at it..

Depersonalisation is something I get especially when I’m experiencing very strong emotions in a social context… meaning that I’m not alone where I can deal with it (like run away or I don’t know).. it’s quite strange how I can literally see myself from the outside, like I’m floating somewhere around and seeing myself do whatever it is I’m doing, or my body & voice is doing ..


Dissociation is described as:

1. The splitting off of a group of mental processes from the main body of
consciousness, as in amnesia.
2. The act of separating or state of being separated.
3. The separation into two or more fragments.

In severe forms of dissociation, disconnection occurs in the usually integrated functions of consciousness, memory, identity, or perception. For example, someone may think about an event that was tremendously upsetting yet have no feelings about it. Clinically, this is termed emotional numbing, one of the hallmarks of post-traumatic stress disorder. Dissociation is a psychological process commonly found in persons seeking mental health treatment (Maldonado et al., 2002).

Dissociation may also occur when there has been severe neglect or emotional abuse, even when there has been no overt physical or sexual abuse (Anderson & Alexander, 1996; West, Adam, Spreng, & Rose, 2001). Children may also become dissociative in families in which the parents are frightening, unpredictable, are dissociative themselves, or make highly contradictory communications (Blizard, 2001; Liotti, 1992, 1999a, b).


In the case of depersonalization, the individual may feel detached from his or her entire being (e.g., “I am no one,” “I have no self”). He or she may also feel subjectively detached from aspects of the self, including feelings (e.g., hypoemotionality: “I know I have feelings but I don’t feel them”), thoughts (e.g., “My thoughts don’t feel like my own,” “head filled with cotton”), whole body or body parts, or sensations (e.g., touch, proprioception, hunger, thirst, libido). There may also be a diminished sense of agency (e.g., feeling robotic, like an automaton; lacking control of one’s speech or movements).

Depersonalization-derealization disorder occurs when you persistently or repeatedly have the feeling that you’re observing yourself from outside your body or you have a sense that things around you aren’t real, or both. Feelings of depersonalization and derealization can be very disturbing and may feel like you’re living in a dream.


Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Recent Posts: MAKE BPD STIGMA-FREE!

Hamilton psychiatrist fights suicide with Lake Tahoe swim | TheSpec.com

Source: Hamilton psychiatrist fights suicide with Lake Tahoe swim | TheSpec.com

Do You Know About Borderline Personality Disorder? – Exploring your mind

Source: Do You Know About Borderline Personality Disorder? – Exploring your mind

Seeking Validation from the Wrong People Is Self-Destructive | The Psychology of Self

Source: Seeking Validation from the Wrong People Is Self-Destructive | The Psychology of Self

Recent Posts: DBT Peer Connections

Respecting Emotion & Regulating Emotion: An Introduction to Checking the Facts

Emotions are like a sixth sense because like sight, sound, taste, touch, and smell, they give us important information about our environment that we need to survive. What makes emotions so special is that they help us to act quickly when logical thought is too slow for us to engage in problem-solving. (See Situations below.) However, for people who may be unusually emotionally reactive, sensitive, or have learned to judge or invalidate their emotional sixth sense from culture, values, gender roles, parents, family, loved ones, etc., emotions may not always cause the expected effective response. Therefore, dialectical behavior therapy came up with the skill checking the facts to help us figure out if our emotional responses fit the facts and intensity of a situation and whether an unwanted or distressing emotion needs skills toward accepting and changing or skills toward accepting and tolerating.

Consultation Team Agreements for DBT Peer Support Specialists

Adapted from the Linehan Board of Certification by Rachel Cara Gill For DBT Peer Connections Facebook Group Administrators Consultation Team All DBT Connections Facebook Group Administrators are required to complete the FREE DBT Skills Training E-course prior to joining the consultation team Request to join DBT Peer Connections Facebook Skills Support Group as a general […]

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 868 other followers

Follow Borderline & PMDD on WordPress.com

Goodreads

Blog Stats

  • 11,818 hits

Community

%d bloggers like this: